03 May 2009

Burch & Purchese Dishes 2 - Chocolate 'Pebbles' v 1.1


Continuing our search for interesting textures, techniques and flavours, this dish encapsulates all of these. A dark chocolate mousse is made, once set, it is piped onto discs of thin chocolate sponge. A hot spoon pushes the mousse down to the desired shapes and they are then frozen. We make a chocolate cocoa butter spray mix with the addition of metallic and matt colours to achieve the 'stone' colour. The mousses are sprayed with this mix using our chocolate spraying gun. The texture of the 'pebbles' is achieved with the spray mixture forming small balls as it hits and solidifies on the frozen mousse. To accompany this main component, we produced chocolate 'soil' and made a 'polvoron' using a recipe given to Burch & Purchese by Chef Andoni Luis Aduriz from Mugaritz restaurant in Spain. Both of these components work flavour wise and visually capture the earthy essence we wanted to achieve. The final component is a rosewater jelly which looks like dew settling on the pebbles. We will post more on our these techniques such as chocolate spraying later on, but for now we hope this dish ours gives inspiration to experiment.

5 comments:

Haalo said...

Seriously loved Andoni's polvoron from his dinner at Fenix and this dessert, like all your others, is naturally inspiring.

Darren & Ian said...

Hey, I remember that night. The chefs from Spain were inspiring and we have put into practice their ethos and used some of their flavour combinations in our own dishes. Thanks for the feedback Haalo and for taking the time to visit our site

Craig Dryhurst said...

Hey guys,
I really like this post and wanted to know how you got the rose water to set so clear and make it stand up like that. Is it a fluid gel with gelatine sheets????, because surely powders would make it go cloudy.

Ian Burch & Darren Purchese said...

Cheers Craig,
Jelly really simple mate. dissolve a quanity of sugar with water and add soaked gelatine. Then stir in cold rosewater, pass and set into a plastic container. When ready to serve just 'spoon' some jelly out on to a plate. Use a warm spoon. We use gold gelatine and usually the ratio to set is 8 leaves per litre, for this recipe we wanted a softer set so used 6.5. Obviously play around with quanties of water, sugar and rosewater to achieve the desired taste. Well don on your blog mate, we check regularly. Take care and speak soon. Darren and Ian

Craig Dryhurst said...

Cheers for that.